A Brief Reply to Tuggy’s Clarifications

In response to one of my recent posts, Dr. Tuggy wrote three posts that clarify some issues that I raised. Here are some things that I found puzzling about those posts. 1. Incomparable herds? We aren't given any reason why the point I've made about the "herd of jostling, competing theories" for the Trinity and… Continue reading A Brief Reply to Tuggy’s Clarifications

Scoffer or Scholar? A Response to Dale Tuggy

I have already received something of a lampooning from the Unitarian Christian Alliance's (hereafter, UCA) chair and vice chair due to a post on the organization's "affirmation."The strong reaction that I received is clearly because of the rhetorical flourish at the end of that post: "Unitarian Confusion Alliance." I viewed this as a parody, not… Continue reading Scoffer or Scholar? A Response to Dale Tuggy

The Unitarian Christian Alliance: Who’s In or Out?

Recently a band of scholars and pastors came together to form what is called "The Unitarian Christian Alliance" (hereafter, UCA). As best as I can tell, the board consists of mostly biblical unitarians, or (though less accurate in some respects) Socinians. These board members believe that the Father of Jesus Christ is the only truly… Continue reading The Unitarian Christian Alliance: Who’s In or Out?

Making Sense of Patristic Christological Readings of the Old Testament

Reading the surviving writings of the earliest Christian authors can be challenging, rewarding, and perhaps above all frustrating. What I have found, more quickly than anything else, is just how differently these writers' perspectives and overall patterns of thinking differ from my own. As John Behr frequently puts it in his talks, we have to… Continue reading Making Sense of Patristic Christological Readings of the Old Testament

A Summary of Basil’s Against Eunomius, Book 3

In the prior two books of Against Eunomius, Basil addresses what Eunomius claims about the Father (Book 1) and the Son (Book 2). The major claim that Eunomius has made is that "unbegotten" and "begotten" refer to the substance of the Father and the Son, respectively. Basil disagrees with this central tenet and offers his own… Continue reading A Summary of Basil’s Against Eunomius, Book 3

A Summary of Basil’s Against Eunomius, Book 2

In Book 1 of Against Eunomius, Basil addresses the term "unbegotten." Ultimately, the term means the same as "Father" (1.5), and hence refers to one who always, in eternity, has a Son (1.20; cf. 2:12). Against Eunomius, he says that "unbegotten" does not refer to God's substance (1.15). Book 1 addresses the "God of the universe,"… Continue reading A Summary of Basil’s Against Eunomius, Book 2